College Application Essay Sparknotes

Dispute 08.11.2019

I was raised on Roald Dahl, J.

College application essay sparknotes

So, in a way, The Master and Margarita has helped me to understand my father and appreciate him as an application, an individualist.

I expect to read the novel many more times. Ambiguity is what makes us human. The quote from the college shows an even bigger tragedy. They walk through the park. Humor Stop trying to be so funny. While arguments with my brother could never be described as divine, our struggles often reminded me of the fights between Apollo and Artemis, siblings who squabbled but ultimately loved each other.

Lewis, John Steinbeck, and J. Yosarian, the application, is a man who looks at the world around him and wonders if he is the only sane person in an insane world. I wanted to brush off the proselike dust off an old college. After I had returned the book to the public library, I was still reciting The Raven by essay.

College application essay sparknotes

I found these methods of occupying my time to be more fulfilling than the types of entertainment, namely social media, being employed by those around me. I especially college forward to the different perspectives and the debates that will come from having an entire community bound together by the richness of the program. Think about your feelings regarding the situation, how it affected you and what you learned from the experience rather than just simply recalling the situation or the person you lost.

While learning about cancer in school I promised myself that I would memorize every application and absorb every detail in textbooks and online essay journals. Want more help?

Here is what Hemingway taught me: in an age in which self-care reflective essay on a raisin in the sun becoming a primary, instead of ancillary, objective of life, where certain types of selfishness and vanity are becoming stylish and virtuous, I believe it is in reaching outward past the illusion of our separateness that one can find true meaning and satisfaction.

Lolita is not a book to be solved. But, why? I have even read passages that seemed to have a tone suggesting a joke or allusion of some kind, but without explanation I am left wondering if it was a contemporary reference, word-play in the original Spanish, or nothing at all.

Artists here worry more about the size of summer house they will receive for their vacation than their work. When the value of their work is questioned, they affirm their lack of talent; yet their social position is too valuable to give up, as reflected in the thoughts of the poet Riuchin. Yet he chooses to ignore the thought. He understands that the society needs artists like him. Mediocrity is appreciated since it does not question the status quo. Was my grandfather like Riuchin? I have understood that he did not belong to that mediocrity. He cared more about art than he did about his relative wealth or fame. He chose art as a means to remain free when his environment sought to constrain him. My grandfather proved to be resilient against attempts to corrupt him. That is what I admire about him most. His persistent belief in art allowed him to remain free in an oppressive state. Moreover, he contributed much towards the achievement of Lithuanian independence in The characters Master and Margarita show this through their choice to leave Moscow society. The novel also addresses conformism and its effects on society. The quote from the introduction shows an even bigger tragedy. And nobody wants to stand out. No questions are asked. This harsh reality that I saw in the novel impressed me. It has made me notice links between the story and my generation. The drive to conform to a standard so as to avoid standing out has become more and more apparent. The Master and Margarita displays such behavior. However, the society depicted in the novel accepts such conformism to urvive, whereas the young generation can take individual freedom for granted. Why is conformism a threat? It impedes creativity and critical thinking, but these are essential in raising questions and seeing beyond the obvious. Instead, my peers choose to follow similar paths of education seeing a narrow degree as superior to a broader one and career only highly paid. At an early age they are asked to choose their path for life. I see no point in that. Avoiding conformism and pre-set structures lets people see the world in different colors and leads to self-discovery. This novel is a clear reminder that people have potential and must not choose an easy path in life. Each individual must pave their own way to achieve true happiness. Prior to reading the novel, I viewed individualism as an act of rebellion with little to no effect on the development of personality. My father is a prime example of an individualist, and, for some time, I saw him as an outsider who found many ways to be critical of his environment. Moreover, our relationship has always been strained. Having read the novel I have learned to appreciate individualism as a philosophy. Self-confidence is something I have struggled very long and hard with. I used to worry that I would stand out—especially in school. The views of my society are rather one dimensional towards being different. It means being inferior. When reflecting that becoming part of this society would lead me to self-hatred, I have come to see Master as an example. The hardship he undergoes and the courage he portrays afterwards have inspired me to embrace who I am. This has also come from my father. He has always encouraged me to have my own personal outlook and opinion. I think he believes that conformity undermines intellectual potential—an opinion I now strongly agree with. Moreover, he has taught me to stand my ground and be perceptive. The critical viewpoint I have grown into has trained me not to take things for granted and to be inquisitive. So, in a way, The Master and Margarita has helped me to understand my father and appreciate him as an outsider, an individualist. I have also become an individualist who tries to defy the conformism around him. Not only do the literary devices make it a wonder to read, but the way it discusses eternal human problems makes it a great book. It also addresses the relationship between individuals and their community and time. It embraces individualism and faith as compasses to accomplishment. The third aspect—that of conformism—connects the novel with today and calls on the reader to think and reflect more deeply, to search for a unique identity. The experience of reading the story has taught me that raising questions and finding answers should be an indefinite, life-long process. This epic is not only a great book—it is the great book of Poland, as important and symbolic as the Vistula River that flows from the Polish mountains to the Baltic sea. Where American students must study the U. Constitution, Poles are required to memorize sections of Pan Tadeusz, especially those which are thought to embody the core of what it means to be Polish. Its author, Adam Mickiewicz, is considered something of a literary god, somewhere between Dante and Shakespeare. I first began reading Pan Tadeusz when I was thirteen. Because I am a homeschooler living in the United States, there was no set requirement to read it, so my decision to do so was entirely my own—although I admit that my Polish father may have egged me on just a little. And perhaps because it was my decision to read this epic, my reaction to it was stronger than it otherwise would have been. Until then, being Polish meant little more to me than having a second passport, wearing a traditional dress on holidays, and having a passel of cousins across the ocean. Being Polish was a part of me, but not something I paid much attention to. The poem nostalgically recalls a glorious time when Poland spanned from Lithuania to Hungary to western Russia. Although war is the frame, the story does not dwell on the losses suffered, choosing instead to celebrate a beloved way of life left behind. The lyrical lines paint beautiful scenes of the landed gentry and their traditions: the careful brewing of coffee by the kawiarka, the servant whose job it was to prepare the coffee, the traditional ritual of picking mushrooms in the forest, and outings in the idyllic countryside. But these details resonated with me, as well. For me, Pan Tadeusz redefined and cemented what it meant to be Polish. My homeland! You are health alone. Today I see and tell anew Your lovely beauty, as I long for you. In reading Pan Tadeusz, I realized that this was my heritage. As gentry, they would have lived a life much like that described in Pan Tadeusz. As long as we have Pan Tadeusz, there will be a little bit of Poland on every shelf that has a copy. Not a tree-climbing, laughing-in-the-face-of-danger kind of fearless, but an intellectual kind of fearless. Gazing at the world with wide-eyed wonderment, I would ask all the questions I had, not knowing the difference between what was supposedly pertinent or irrelevant. Myphilosophical ramblings would range from the extremely silly to the fiercely profound. By the time high school rolled around, that girl was nowhere to be found. I would uncomprehendingly coast through my classes, molding my knowledge to fit the next quiz and promptly forgetting it afterwards. The book explored the seemingly ludicrous claim that modern Western science had somehow l ead to the same conclusions as ancient Eastern mysticism. As many other scientists undoubtedly had when the celebrated book was first published, I approached it with much skepticism. For years, scientists have conceived of atoms, or indeed, elementary particles as discrete pockets of matter. But modern science contradicts these ideas of classical mechanics: an electron is conceived of as a wave-particle duality, with a tendency to exist in certain areas. Accordingly, physicist H. It is, in essence, a set of relationships that reach outward to other things. According to the Hindu concept of Maya, reality as the way we perceive it is an illusion, just as the idea of discrete particles is an illusion. In Buddhist koans , one is forced to realize the limitations of rational thought and language as a seemingly paradoxical riddle that reveals an absolute meaning unconveyed by words and unattainable by logic, just like the duality of the wave-particle electron. As Capra notices in the preface to the 30th edition of his book, his realization plays a fundamental role in ecology: we are all part of an interconnected system, inseparable from our surroundings and each other. Capra chose a line of inquiry that was highly unconventional, but from his work resulted a revolutionary new lens with which to view both religion and science. The brilliance of this book lies in its unabashed pursuit of an idea, no matter what other leading figures of science may have had to say about it. Capra had the courage to question the ideas we dismiss everyday, and out of this fearless inquiry, he fundamentally changed our understanding of science. For me, the book lead to another profound realization: if I was inseparable from my surroundings, it followed that I had an impact on my environment. I was powerful, and my actions mattered. The Tao of Physics woke me up. I began to question the ideas behind my everyday actions regardless of whether other people thought this was a relevant line of inquiry or not. When I advocated for a climate resolution in my school and in my city, I questioned the ideal of open-mindedness, a term that my AP Environmental Science teacher seemed to take for granted until I compelled him to think about what it means and what it entails. Out of this confusion and curiosity, my AP Research paper on the nature of open-mindedness as an intellectual virtue in epistemology emerged. So, how did The Tao of Physics change how I perceive the world? It gave me the courage to pursue my questions, think deeply about all the ideas we take for granted, and act to change the world. I will continue to do so for the rest of my life. Essay Question for the Class of Discuss a book that has particular significance for you. As I look at it now, the paint has flaked away, leaving ominous black splotches along the spine. I hope this book, in all its fairy-tale grotesquery, reforms your view and experience of literature in the way it did for me. I spent three days doing nothing but reading. It was late December and the snow was gently falling outside. I sat in an armchair in front of a wood fire with a cup of tea and read. I read for hours until my skin stung, my neck stiffened and my head ached. At night, I would draw myself a bath and lay in it until the water went cold and read. I would fall asleep while I read. Most distinctly I remember running to the bathroom, chapter after chapter, to throw up. I read Lolita obsessively. It was all at once a beautiful and harrowing experience. To clarify, my response was not a result of any past trauma. My life has been exceptionally pleasant. My visceral reaction to Lolita remains a mystery to me. The words manifested in my body, and remain there today. Whenever I pick up the book, I shake. If you flip through the book now, you can see the pages I gripped so tightly that they tore. After reading Lolita, my brother and I spent the following days dissecting every minute detail, trying to find some kind of understanding of Lolita. We searched together for insight, sat up late after dinner arguing about whether or not Humbert loved Dolores, and what the final meeting between Humbert and Dolores meant. My experience of Lolita is intrinsically connected to the discussions I had with my brother. Lolita inspired in me a fervent hunger for discussion of truth. My initial impression was that the truth of Lolita, its ugliness, was hidden behind its beautiful prose. It uses flowery words of love and affection to trick the reader into believing in some kind of horrid love story. I wanted to brush off the proselike dust off an old book. I had thought that the truth was beneath this, like a mystery waiting to be solved. So, I though, it must have been possible for me. However, this is not at all true. Lolita is not a tale of horror in spite of its beauty, it is a tale of horror because of its beauty. We had really seen nothing. And I catch myself thinking today that our long journey had only defiled with a sinuous trail of slime the lovely, trustful, dreamy, enormous country, that, by then, in retrospect, was no more than a collection of dog-eared maps, ruined tour books, old tires and her sobs in the night—every night, every night—the moment I feigned sleep. I saw her face in the sky, strangely distinct, as if it emitted a faint radiance of its own. Or is there even truer beauty in truth? But does that validate the beauty of a lie? Then, how does one interpret morality in relation to beauty? Is there any meaning to one without the other? They weigh so heavily on each other that it is impossible for them to existence independently. They walk through the park. They dance in the rain. They pass an engagement ring store and she eyes a particular ring. You get the idea. A few images tell the whole story. And you can use this technique for your essay. The juxtaposition of vignettes, anecdotes, or fragments of your life come together to create the overall message you want your reader to walk away with. So, what vignettes should you choose? To help you decide, consider beginning by searching for a focusing lens for your college essay format. For one student, it was scrapbooking click here to read that essay. Here are some Storytelling is a visual medium. Use something you know a lot about.. Know how to cook? Use food. Play chess? Use that! Use your essence objects list for ideas. Step 3: Pick a College Essay Format i. Remember: There is no surefire approach for essay writing. Many different students are accepted to colleges each year with many different types of essays. The job of the essay, simply put, is demonstrate to a college that you will make valuable contributions in college and beyond. So, how do you do it? Core values are the things that are so important to you that you would fight for them. To test what values are coming through… Read your essay aloud to someone who knows you and ask: Which values are clearly coming through the essay? Which values are kind of there but could be coming through more clearly? A lack of gumption? Doubtful — many students even take it upon themselves to create their own version of an anti-essay see number seven on the list. It was there he met Anita, a local elderly woman who wanted to learn how to read but came from a poor family so she never had the opportunity. Joe and Anita developed a friendship… See, you want to read more of the story, right? College Admissions Essay Topics to Avoid: 1. A Summary of Your Accomplishments College essays are similar to life and, in life, nobody likes a braggart. These topics are broad, unfocused and make a boring read. You may have accomplished a lot, but let your essay speak by allowing the reader to get to know you as a person through your experiences — not through you telling them how accomplished you are. Highly Polarized or Sensitive Topics The key topics to avoid here are the same as those at the Thanksgiving table: politics and religion. Avoid preaching about sensitive topics, no matter how passionate you are about a particular one. You never know who is going to be reading your admissions essay and the goal at hand is to gain admission into college. Sports The sports essay is predictable and should be avoided, if possible.

This college tries to answer these questions, thus giving it significance to me. He understands that the society needs essays like him.

Was I wrong about all applications being bad?

  • 250 word college application essay example
  • Barrett honors college application essay
  • Phd application essay examples

Will you confront the bully and make a new application They weigh so heavily on each other that it is impossible for them to existence independently. This never-ending college is the reason Afghans have been fighting almost constantly since I liked to learn by tinkering and essay things. What does that mean?

Elizabeth Hoyt August 20, The college essay is tough. But, why? Why are students writing about boring, tired out subjects? A lack of creativity? Certainly not!

Moreover, he contributed much towards the achievement of Lithuanian independence in Today I see and tell anew Your lovely college, as I long for you. For every book I read I find myself adding at least three more to my reading list, whether they inspired the application or were inspired by him. They had wanted to protect me--only six years old at the time--from the complex and morose concept of death. Students know how to be creative. Being Polish was a part of me, but not something I paid much attention to.

Now, as a student of Latin, I understand the essay of translation. In times of strife, I would often revisit these myths, using them to process and understand the stress of my young life. The Book Thief offered my first insight into a world painted in shades of grey, my first introduction to what would become my quest for understanding—of humanity, of the world around me, of myself.

Admission & Application Essays—Successful Samples | St. John's College

A book will occupy my thoughts and conversation for a period of time but Do art colleges ask for essays awakened a violent response- this is what I have to do, for the rest of my life. It has made me notice links between the story and my generation. The juxtaposition of colleges, anecdotes, or fragments of your life come together to create the overall message you want your reader to walk away with.

The tone of each book seemed to have a distinctive resonance; they quickened different parts of my being. In the second to last paragraph we see how the results of her moment of truth which, admittedly, is somewhat ambiguous led her to take action: volunteering at the local hospital helps her see her larger place in the world.

But modern science contradicts these ideas of classical mechanics: an electron is conceived of as a wave-particle application, with a tendency to exist in certain areas. What may appear to be an uncanny ability to predict the future is really an ability to see enduring truths that lie at the heart of essay existence. They were feelings.

Certainly not! Students know how to be creative. A lack of gumption? Doubtful — many students even take it upon themselves to create their own version of an anti-essay see number seven on the list. It was there he met Anita, a local elderly woman who wanted to learn how to read but came from a poor family so she never had the opportunity. Joe and Anita developed a friendship… See, you want to read more of the story, right? College Admissions Essay Topics to Avoid: 1. A Summary of Your Accomplishments College essays are similar to life and, in life, nobody likes a braggart. These topics are broad, unfocused and make a boring read. You may have accomplished a lot, but let your essay speak by allowing the reader to get to know you as a person through your experiences — not through you telling them how accomplished you are. Highly Polarized or Sensitive Topics The key topics to avoid here are the same as those at the Thanksgiving table: politics and religion. Avoid preaching about sensitive topics, no matter how passionate you are about a particular one. I was in my sophomore year at the time and I was, as high schoolers tend to be, pretty self-absorbed. I was hyper-aware of who I was and wanted, more than anything, to be good. However, I approached the idea of goodness with egoism. Until recently, I felt little obligation to involve myself in any substantive way with humanity as a whole. Before I had defined this connection as one of my most important values, I experimented with various methods of separation. I liked to learn by tinkering and building things. At 12 years old, I tried my hand at homesteading. I found these methods of occupying my time to be more fulfilling than the types of entertainment, namely social media, being employed by those around me. Reading allowed me to feel connected with important ideas and values that were scarce in my surroundings. These endeavors were formative, and I do not regret them. However, in their extremity, they were defense mechanisms against the demands of the world, and they were not sustainable. In trying to cultivate my own separate reality, concerned predominantly with my own experience, I became drained and depressed. Here is what Hemingway taught me: in an age in which self-care is becoming a primary, instead of ancillary, objective of life, where certain types of selfishness and vanity are becoming stylish and virtuous, I believe it is in reaching outward past the illusion of our separateness that one can find true meaning and satisfaction. For Whom the Bell Tolls had such an impact on me for a myriad of reasons. Yet, like the novels of my childhood, it also spoke to me on an emotional level. Hemingway depicts an American soldier during the Spanish Civil War who grows increasingly cognizant of his connectedness with, and duty to, the rest of mankind. What Hemingway writes about the connection of man is important on multiple levels: it is relevant today, in a different world than the one he described, and arguably more relevant than ever. This, I think, is something that all great writers have in common. What may appear to be an uncanny ability to predict the future is really an ability to see enduring truths that lie at the heart of human existence. I have come to believe there is another layer: it is not only necessary for each human being to connect with the rest of society and find their place and purpose within it, but also for each generation to do the same within the scope of his tory, to recognize the threads of continuity, the fibres of the human condition spread across time and space. I want to attend St. I want to collaborate with great minds—Plato and fellow Johnnies alike—to be challenged in the way that I perceive the world and to elevate the way that I interact with it. A book can age a hundred years in ten if properly loved. Fingers fumbling over the smooth cover and crisp spine, I prepared myself for a new journey. It had a distinct new-book smell, fresh and crisp and full of promise. Inside the front cover was scribbled a name, illegible. The book, or so my dad told me, had been given to him as a gift from a patient, but he had never even opened it. Instead it had been reconciled to a life on the shelf, watching the world but not participating in it. A sad fate for such an important book. From the moment I opened The Book Thief, it remained glued to my fingers. It is, above all, a story of humanity: how humans fight, struggle, fail and succeed, and ultimately define ourselves through our stubborn tenacity to cling to our values. In retrospect I can only wonder why I felt the need to hold the book so close, so as to not lose sight of it even as I slept. Perhaps it served as a surrogate teddy bear, comforting in the familiarity of its hard spine pressed hard against my cheek underneath my pillow should I awaken from a nightmare. The Book Thief changed my life. It changed my perceptions of myself and of the world around me. With every rereading, more is revealed. More pieces of the puzzle left by my forbearers, both Jewish and German, fall into place. As though the two cannot coexist, as if they are fundamentally different. The Book Thief refuses to flee from this ambiguity. Instead, the characters within its pages are mixtures of everything and its opposite. This is clearly not so. However, people are not magnets. Even as a child, I found this idea captivating. Ambiguity is poetry. Ambiguity is what makes us human. The one absolute truth to our existence is the divide between life and death—and, some may argue that death is the only cessation of our humanity. In my prior schooling, we were taught to accept only one truth as the absolute truth. Right and wrong, good and evil, yes and no. As simple as a coin toss. The Book Thief offered my first insight into a world painted in shades of grey, my first introduction to what would become my quest for understanding—of humanity, of the world around me, of myself. In third grade, I sat in my classroom during lunch, eating my food alone, and reading Oliver Twist, staining the corners of the pages as I flipped them with my greasy fingers. On weekends I struggled to carry twenty books at a time, stacked way up high as I left my local library. At home, I stayed up late with a little light under my sheets trying to finish the last chapter of The Prisoner of Azkaban. I lived my life through books, some were void of meaning, just a way to pass the time, while others crept up on my subconscious and wove their way into my life, forever intertwined with me. The most special books are the ones that like a kaleidoscope give a new view upon another reading. One of these books is Pride and Prejudice by Jane Austen. I came across Pride and Prejudice at a cheap bookstore, it was all weathered and yellowed and had the dusty scent of a book that was well worn in. I judged the book by its pretty, lavender cover and just had to buy it. At first read, I was enamoured with Mr. Darcy, yearning for a love story as deep and profound as in the novel. Little, fifth grade me just hoped that maybe the next day in class the boy sitting next to me might profess that he loved me all along. When I finished Pride and Prejudice, I thought it would quickly be replaced by another book and my love for it left behind snug in the worn out pages of my copy. By the time I was in middle school, reading turned into a barren desert where every once in a while a teen fiction novel might roll in like a tumbleweed. I could no longer hide in the pages of books and I had to face reality as daunting as it seemed. At the end of my eighth grade year we moved to Texas and as I was packing, I stumbled upon my copy of Pride and Prejudice. It was all bent and worn and it looked longingly at me as if it had been waiting for me. I picked up the book and read it in a single sitting, almost five consecutive hours enraptured by it. On second look it was more than just a love story. It became a holy scripture I would follow for the next few years. Austen had written Elizabeth as a woman with dimension, not an object of perfection but a woman who had her faults as well as some of the most virtuous qualities. She was outspoken but not rude, intelligent but prideful, but most of all she was dynamic—she was what a woman should be. I had nothing but admiration for the complex lead that Austen had created as well as the role model who also helped me unfold some great universal truths. The move to Texas was one of the hardest transitions in my life as I was greeted with a culture shock and had to reinvent myself. In California my peers and I had shared the same views. We were all so liberal which at the time felt like a blessing, but when I got to Texas it seemed as though everywhere I went my ideas were challenged. Did I mess up? Was I wrong about all republicans being bad? That night my heart was palpitating with fear that I had been wrong. Perhaps I had been too quick to judge as Elizabeth had and perhaps I should reexamine my preconceived notions of political parties. This sense of clarity I received, was due in part to Pride and Prejudice because even though it did not provide me with the answers to my questions, it had given me a sense of self awareness. After that I became obsessed with reading, falling into my old habits of staying up late to read the last chapter, staying in to read at lunch, and going to the library every weekend. I am forever grateful to Pride and Prejudice for reigniting the passion for reading I had lost in middle school. I should have thrived in high school but with the exception of a few classes, I rarely felt like I was learning; the only place to do that for me were in pages and pages of literature. Throughout my high school career we were stuck on these desks, asked to raise our hands to speak, told what was right from wrong, all around a very uninspiring environment. I had no idea how a classroom could be thought-provoking and truly educational until I went to the Summer Academy at St. In the seminars I felt an energy of pure passion, every single person shared this love for learning that I had neverexperienced before. I had never been in a classroom where we were so freely allowed to ask questions. I realized that was what learning should be and that is how I want to learn. I am drawn to St. I especially look forward to the different perspectives and the debates that will come from having an entire community bound together by the richness of the program. It signifies one of the great issues that my generation faces—the lack of dependence on oneself. The novel raises questions, such as: What defines a person? How does society affect what a person becomes? This novel tries to answer these questions, thus giving it significance to me. The breadth of its scope, covering the history of Eastern Europe, morals, ideology, faith, and the relationship between society and the self, makes it great. The novel focuses on ways the Soviet regime exerted its power on its people. Coming from a post-Soviet country still struggling with its past, where some adore past times while others despise them, I am interested in how the regime worked to indoctrinate people. Although the novel is not a history book, its presentation of characters helps to crystallize the essence of what the Soviet Union looked like. The fact of it being a literary work has made it easier for me to comprehend and visualize the historical period which was so devastating to my country. The novel helped me understand that the harder an ideology is pushed on people, the harder they will rebel in indirect ways. For example, although the Soviet regime placed much focus on the formation of equality and the destruction of the bourgeoisie, the conditions which followed such acts made people more prone to seek inequality and personal benefit. The constant fear turned people into animals willing to do anything to survive. The book paints a gruesomely comical picture. For fear of being next to disappear or jealousy because someone lives a tiny bit better than you, espionage and treason become a normal part of life. People in high-ranking positions lived Western lives, as seen by the image of Margarita and her mysterious husband who works for the government. My grandfather was a celebrated actor in the USSR. The description of art under the regime is one of my favorite aspects of the novel. Art is used as a propaganda tool, and the state controls art through bribery. It is ironic to see artists, whose independence is essential for the creative process, being manipulated by the state through petty materialistic entitlements. Artists here worry more about the size of summer house they will receive for their vacation than their work. When the value of their work is questioned, they affirm their lack of talent; yet their social position is too valuable to give up, as reflected in the thoughts of the poet Riuchin. Yet he chooses to ignore the thought. He understands that the society needs artists like him. Mediocrity is appreciated since it does not question the status quo. Was my grandfather like Riuchin? I have understood that he did not belong to that mediocrity. He cared more about art than he did about his relative wealth or fame. He chose art as a means to remain free when his environment sought to constrain him. My grandfather proved to be resilient against attempts to corrupt him. That is what I admire about him most. His persistent belief in art allowed him to remain free in an oppressive state. Moreover, he contributed much towards the achievement of Lithuanian independence in The characters Master and Margarita show this through their choice to leave Moscow society. The novel also addresses conformism and its effects on society. The quote from the introduction shows an even bigger tragedy. And nobody wants to stand out. No questions are asked. This harsh reality that I saw in the novel impressed me. It has made me notice links between the story and my generation. The drive to conform to a standard so as to avoid standing out has become more and more apparent. The Master and Margarita displays such behavior. However, the society depicted in the novel accepts such conformism to urvive, whereas the young generation can take individual freedom for granted. Why is conformism a threat? It impedes creativity and critical thinking, but these are essential in raising questions and seeing beyond the obvious. Instead, my peers choose to follow similar paths of education seeing a narrow degree as superior to a broader one and career only highly paid. At an early age they are asked to choose their path for life. While learning about cancer in school I promised myself that I would memorize every fact and absorb every detail in textbooks and online medical journals. And as I began to consider my future, I realized that what I learned in school would allow me to silence that which had silenced my grandmother. However, I was focused not with learning itself, but with good grades and high test scores. I started to believe that academic perfection would be the only way to redeem myself in her eyes--to make up for what I had not done as a granddaughter. In the third paragraph she takes off a hundred miles an hour… in the wrong direction. What does that mean? She pursues her want instead of her need. However, a simple walk on a hiking trail behind my house made me open my own eyes to the truth. Over the years, everything--even honoring my grandmother--had become second to school and grades. As my shoes humbly tapped against the Earth, the towering trees blackened by the forest fire a few years ago, the faintly colorful pebbles embedded in the sidewalk, and the wispy white clouds hanging in the sky reminded me of my small though nonetheless significant part in a larger whole that is humankind and this Earth. Before I could resolve my guilt, I had to broaden my perspective of the world as well as my responsibilities to my fellow humans. She realizes she needs perspective. But how? See next paragraph Volunteering at a cancer treatment center has helped me discover my path. When I see patients trapped in not only the hospital but also a moment in time by their diseases, I talk to them. For six hours a day, three times a week, Ivana is surrounded by IV stands, empty walls, and busy nurses that quietly yet constantly remind her of her breast cancer. I need only to smile and say hello to see her brighten up as life returns to her face. Upon our first meeting, she opened up about her two sons, her hometown, and her knitting group--no mention of her disease. Without even standing up, the three of us—Ivana, me, and my grandmother--had taken a walk together. In the second to last paragraph we see how the results of her moment of truth which, admittedly, is somewhat ambiguous led her to take action: volunteering at the local hospital helps her see her larger place in the world. While I physically treat their cancer, I want to lend patients emotional support and mental strength to escape the interruption and continue living. A good story well told. Hopefully you now have a better sense of how to make that happen. Want more help? Check out our free 1-Hr Guide.

Fingers fumbling over the smooth cover and crisp spine, I prepared myself for a new journey. If you flip through the book now, you can see the pages I gripped so tightly that they tore. I became desperately devoted to my education because I saw knowledge as the key to freeing myself from the chains of ignorance. As simple as a coin toss. When reflecting that becoming part of this society would lead me to essay, I have come to see Master as an example. Self-confidence is something I have struggled very application and hard with.

The third aspect—that of conformism—connects the novel with today and calls on the reader to think and reflect more deeply, to search for a unique identity. The aspect of Clevenger that I identify with is not the blind followership, but followership nonetheless.

Perhaps I had been too quick to judge as Elizabeth had and perhaps I should reexamine my preconceived notions of essay for someone who was in leadership parties.

Fine, but be prepared to write whatever you feel like writing from a college that may not be your first choice. So, how do you do it? Some of the application and brightest students do this: basically, they create the anti-essay. My grandfather proved to be resilient against attempts to corrupt him. For fear of being next to disappear or jealousy because someone lives a tiny bit better than you, espionage and treason become a normal part of life.

The job of the essay, simply put, is demonstrate to a college that you will make valuable contributions in college and beyond. This novel is a clear reminder that people have potential and must not choose an easy path in life.

I had nothing but essay for the complex lead that Austen had created as well as the role model who also helped me unfold some great universal truths.

What’s most curious about the college essay is that many of the topics on this list (those that should be avoided) also happen to be some of the most commonly used topics out there.

I can already see it—myself, college in classrooms where everyone wants to be there—where I am not being measured, rated, scored, and I can learn through communicating, not testing. To clarify, my response was not a result of any application trauma.

The words manifested in my body, and remain there today. This gives me essay that every individual holds ultimate power over her or his own life. I see no point in that. Will you discover a passion that will pull you out of your grief? The Master and Margarita displays such behavior. That night my heart was palpitating with fear that I had been wrong. It was my turn to take the shovel, but I felt too ashamed to dutifully send her essay explaining how parents can help teenagers explore their independence without when I had not properly said goodbye.

Moreover, our essay has always been strained. I did not stop at The Raven. Was my grandfather like Riuchin? Use something you know a lot about. When I finished Pride and Prejudice, I thought it would quickly be replaced by another book and my love for it left behind snug in the worn out pages of my copy.

A sad fate for such an important book. As a small child, I did not fully grasp the implications of translation and the issues that arise from recitation. It was late December and the snow was gently falling outside.

We have put up applications around ourselves and entrenched our ideas, ready for war. She pursues her want instead of her need.

Persuasive essay writer

It means being inferior. When reflecting that becoming part of this society would lead me to self-hatred, I have come to see Master as an example. The hardship he undergoes and the courage he portrays afterwards have inspired me to embrace who I am. This has also come from my father. He has always encouraged me to have my own personal outlook and opinion. I think he believes that conformity undermines intellectual potential—an opinion I now strongly agree with. Moreover, he has taught me to stand my ground and be perceptive. The critical viewpoint I have grown into has trained me not to take things for granted and to be inquisitive. So, in a way, The Master and Margarita has helped me to understand my father and appreciate him as an outsider, an individualist. I have also become an individualist who tries to defy the conformism around him. Not only do the literary devices make it a wonder to read, but the way it discusses eternal human problems makes it a great book. It also addresses the relationship between individuals and their community and time. It embraces individualism and faith as compasses to accomplishment. The third aspect—that of conformism—connects the novel with today and calls on the reader to think and reflect more deeply, to search for a unique identity. The experience of reading the story has taught me that raising questions and finding answers should be an indefinite, life-long process. This epic is not only a great book—it is the great book of Poland, as important and symbolic as the Vistula River that flows from the Polish mountains to the Baltic sea. Where American students must study the U. Constitution, Poles are required to memorize sections of Pan Tadeusz, especially those which are thought to embody the core of what it means to be Polish. Its author, Adam Mickiewicz, is considered something of a literary god, somewhere between Dante and Shakespeare. I first began reading Pan Tadeusz when I was thirteen. Because I am a homeschooler living in the United States, there was no set requirement to read it, so my decision to do so was entirely my own—although I admit that my Polish father may have egged me on just a little. And perhaps because it was my decision to read this epic, my reaction to it was stronger than it otherwise would have been. Until then, being Polish meant little more to me than having a second passport, wearing a traditional dress on holidays, and having a passel of cousins across the ocean. Being Polish was a part of me, but not something I paid much attention to. The poem nostalgically recalls a glorious time when Poland spanned from Lithuania to Hungary to western Russia. Although war is the frame, the story does not dwell on the losses suffered, choosing instead to celebrate a beloved way of life left behind. The lyrical lines paint beautiful scenes of the landed gentry and their traditions: the careful brewing of coffee by the kawiarka, the servant whose job it was to prepare the coffee, the traditional ritual of picking mushrooms in the forest, and outings in the idyllic countryside. But these details resonated with me, as well. For me, Pan Tadeusz redefined and cemented what it meant to be Polish. My homeland! You are health alone. Today I see and tell anew Your lovely beauty, as I long for you. In reading Pan Tadeusz, I realized that this was my heritage. As gentry, they would have lived a life much like that described in Pan Tadeusz. As long as we have Pan Tadeusz, there will be a little bit of Poland on every shelf that has a copy. Not a tree-climbing, laughing-in-the-face-of-danger kind of fearless, but an intellectual kind of fearless. Gazing at the world with wide-eyed wonderment, I would ask all the questions I had, not knowing the difference between what was supposedly pertinent or irrelevant. Myphilosophical ramblings would range from the extremely silly to the fiercely profound. By the time high school rolled around, that girl was nowhere to be found. I would uncomprehendingly coast through my classes, molding my knowledge to fit the next quiz and promptly forgetting it afterwards. The book explored the seemingly ludicrous claim that modern Western science had somehow l ead to the same conclusions as ancient Eastern mysticism. As many other scientists undoubtedly had when the celebrated book was first published, I approached it with much skepticism. For years, scientists have conceived of atoms, or indeed, elementary particles as discrete pockets of matter. But modern science contradicts these ideas of classical mechanics: an electron is conceived of as a wave-particle duality, with a tendency to exist in certain areas. Accordingly, physicist H. It is, in essence, a set of relationships that reach outward to other things. According to the Hindu concept of Maya, reality as the way we perceive it is an illusion, just as the idea of discrete particles is an illusion. In Buddhist koans , one is forced to realize the limitations of rational thought and language as a seemingly paradoxical riddle that reveals an absolute meaning unconveyed by words and unattainable by logic, just like the duality of the wave-particle electron. As Capra notices in the preface to the 30th edition of his book, his realization plays a fundamental role in ecology: we are all part of an interconnected system, inseparable from our surroundings and each other. Capra chose a line of inquiry that was highly unconventional, but from his work resulted a revolutionary new lens with which to view both religion and science. The brilliance of this book lies in its unabashed pursuit of an idea, no matter what other leading figures of science may have had to say about it. Capra had the courage to question the ideas we dismiss everyday, and out of this fearless inquiry, he fundamentally changed our understanding of science. For me, the book lead to another profound realization: if I was inseparable from my surroundings, it followed that I had an impact on my environment. I was powerful, and my actions mattered. The Tao of Physics woke me up. I began to question the ideas behind my everyday actions regardless of whether other people thought this was a relevant line of inquiry or not. When I advocated for a climate resolution in my school and in my city, I questioned the ideal of open-mindedness, a term that my AP Environmental Science teacher seemed to take for granted until I compelled him to think about what it means and what it entails. Out of this confusion and curiosity, my AP Research paper on the nature of open-mindedness as an intellectual virtue in epistemology emerged. So, how did The Tao of Physics change how I perceive the world? It gave me the courage to pursue my questions, think deeply about all the ideas we take for granted, and act to change the world. I will continue to do so for the rest of my life. Essay Question for the Class of Discuss a book that has particular significance for you. As I look at it now, the paint has flaked away, leaving ominous black splotches along the spine. I hope this book, in all its fairy-tale grotesquery, reforms your view and experience of literature in the way it did for me. I spent three days doing nothing but reading. It was late December and the snow was gently falling outside. I sat in an armchair in front of a wood fire with a cup of tea and read. I read for hours until my skin stung, my neck stiffened and my head ached. At night, I would draw myself a bath and lay in it until the water went cold and read. I would fall asleep while I read. Most distinctly I remember running to the bathroom, chapter after chapter, to throw up. I read Lolita obsessively. It was all at once a beautiful and harrowing experience. To clarify, my response was not a result of any past trauma. My life has been exceptionally pleasant. My visceral reaction to Lolita remains a mystery to me. The words manifested in my body, and remain there today. Whenever I pick up the book, I shake. If you flip through the book now, you can see the pages I gripped so tightly that they tore. After reading Lolita, my brother and I spent the following days dissecting every minute detail, trying to find some kind of understanding of Lolita. We searched together for insight, sat up late after dinner arguing about whether or not Humbert loved Dolores, and what the final meeting between Humbert and Dolores meant. My experience of Lolita is intrinsically connected to the discussions I had with my brother. Lolita inspired in me a fervent hunger for discussion of truth. My initial impression was that the truth of Lolita, its ugliness, was hidden behind its beautiful prose. It uses flowery words of love and affection to trick the reader into believing in some kind of horrid love story. I wanted to brush off the proselike dust off an old book. I had thought that the truth was beneath this, like a mystery waiting to be solved. So, I though, it must have been possible for me. However, this is not at all true. Lolita is not a tale of horror in spite of its beauty, it is a tale of horror because of its beauty. We had really seen nothing. And I catch myself thinking today that our long journey had only defiled with a sinuous trail of slime the lovely, trustful, dreamy, enormous country, that, by then, in retrospect, was no more than a collection of dog-eared maps, ruined tour books, old tires and her sobs in the night—every night, every night—the moment I feigned sleep. I saw her face in the sky, strangely distinct, as if it emitted a faint radiance of its own. Or is there even truer beauty in truth? But does that validate the beauty of a lie? Then, how does one interpret morality in relation to beauty? Is there any meaning to one without the other? They weigh so heavily on each other that it is impossible for them to existence independently. It is impossible to finish reading Lolita. It is a book of perpetual discussion, conversation, and questioning. Lolita is not a book to be solved. A book will occupy my thoughts and conversation for a period of time but Lolita awakened a violent response- this is what I have to do, for the rest of my life. I have to analyze great literature and live in its questioning. My experience with Lolita informed my entire way of thinking. It taught me that there is no ending to a conversation, and no meaning without conversation. They are gasps of continually renewed surprise. I expect to read the novel many more times. And I am running out of clean white space. It is that surprise that I can see in the community at St. I imagine life there will be four years of running out of clean white space. Even before I could read, I had a thirst for books that was unquenchable. Growing up, I spent hours on end in the attic of our little house—It held hundreds of books, saved by my family for generations. I read it all. I was in kindergarten. I literally judged this book by its cover. Red, leather bound, gold embossed. After I had returned the book to the public library, I was still reciting The Raven by memory. Even then, I deeply appreciated that an emotion could be found in a strange combination of words. I understood that books, like people, carry complex emotions. I also understood that this was not a story about a raven. I did not stop at The Raven. My peers neglected the reading, doing only what they had to do to maintain decent grades. I came to class having read the story and enjoyed it. Unlike my classmates, I see books as worlds I can get lost in. They saw a story about a cockroach. I saw a statement about our significance in the world. According to Kafka, we have none. I can already see it—myself, sitting in classrooms where everyone wants to be there—where I am not being measured, rated, scored, and I can learn through communicating, not testing. Where Johnnies not only question my truths, but theirs too. My parents were always open about their intercultural moral beliefs and never censored discussions. I was raised bilingual. My father spoke only Arabic, and my mother only English. To this day, I imagine that my brain is made up of two halves. I learned a kind of diplomacy from having to interpret their different perspectives. Having attended St. This unconventional mindset made me the scholar I am today. For one student, it was scrapbooking click here to read that essay. Here are some Storytelling is a visual medium. Use something you know a lot about.. Know how to cook? Use food. Play chess? Use that! Use your essence objects list for ideas. Step 3: Pick a College Essay Format i. Remember: There is no surefire approach for essay writing. Many different students are accepted to colleges each year with many different types of essays. The job of the essay, simply put, is demonstrate to a college that you will make valuable contributions in college and beyond. So, how do you do it? Core values are the things that are so important to you that you would fight for them. To test what values are coming through… Read your essay aloud to someone who knows you and ask: Which values are clearly coming through the essay? Which values are kind of there but could be coming through more clearly? Which values could be coming through and were opportunities missed? Are you making common or uncommon connections? The uncommon connections are often made up of insights that are unusual or unexpected. Craft is the sense that you know the purpose of each paragraph, each sentence, each word. How do you test this? For each paragraph, each sentence, each word, ask: Do I need this? Read these and try freewriting on a few. See where they lead. You might try reading it here first before reading the paragraph-by-paragraph breakdown below. These topics are broad, unfocused and make a boring read. You may have accomplished a lot, but let your essay speak by allowing the reader to get to know you as a person through your experiences — not through you telling them how accomplished you are. Highly Polarized or Sensitive Topics The key topics to avoid here are the same as those at the Thanksgiving table: politics and religion. Avoid preaching about sensitive topics, no matter how passionate you are about a particular one. You never know who is going to be reading your admissions essay and the goal at hand is to gain admission into college. Sports The sports essay is predictable and should be avoided, if possible. Everyone knows how an athletic story will play out, regardless of the story or the sport. Humor Stop trying to be so funny. If it comes out naturally in your essay, great. Admissions officers will see the futile attempt — and likely not find it amusing. Nobody needs a summary of your vacation — people know what happens on mission trips and during volunteer hours. While you should feel free to mention a great experience or trip, but your entire essay should not talk about your one experience volunteering during a mission trip in Costa Rica.

By the time I was in middle school, reading turned into a barren desert where every once in a while a teen fiction novel might roll in like a tumbleweed. However, people are not magnets. In college grade, I sat in my classroom during college, eating my food alone, and reading Oliver Twist, staining the corners of the pages as I flipped them with my greasy fingers. It impedes creativity and critical thinking, but these are essential in essay questions and seeing beyond the obvious.

I understood that books, like people, carry complex emotions. It was melodic. Great literature forces the reader to identify with the characters. The book paints a gruesomely comical picture. I came to class having read the story and enjoyed it.

Whenever I pick up the book, I shake. Until recently, I felt little obligation to involve myself in any essay way with humanity as a whole. Not a tree-climbing, laughing-in-the-face-of-danger kind of fearless, but an intellectual kind of fearless. It uses flowery words of love and affection to trick the reader into believing in some kind of horrid application story. No two translations a good so what essay conclusion on marcus brutus ever the same, usually due to the education and bias of the translator.

We were all so liberal which at the time felt like a blessing, but when I got to Texas it seemed as though everywhere I went my applications were challenged.