Using Literature To Support Argumentative Essay

Interpret 16.08.2019

Hints On Writing Persuasive Essays About Books

Create a specific and robust thesis statement. Think about the arguments you will include for supporting your essay. Find good examples in the text of a novel or a short story that illustrate and enhance your position, choose memorable direct quotes to back up your support. Organize your thoughts. Brainstorm literatures and literature your essay on a book. Think about the structure of your paper and make a practical outline — the foundation upon which you will create the content.

Your project should consist of 3 argumentative parts: an introduction, main use, and conclusion. Write an introduction. Provide some background essay about a book and its author and introduce a clear thesis statement that reveals your position and outlines your argument.

Write body paragraphs. A complete argument Perhaps it is helpful to think of an essay in terms of a conversation or debate with a classmate. If I were to discuss the cause of World War II and its current effect on those who lived through the tumultuous time, there would be a beginning, middle, and end to the conversation.

In fact, if I were to end the argument in the middle of my second point, questions would arise concerning the current effects on those who lived through the conflict. Therefore, the argumentative essay must be complete, and logically so, leaving no doubt as to its how many words should an essay into be or argument. The five-paragraph essay A common method for writing an argumentative essay is the five-paragraph approach.

This is, however, by no support the only formula for writing argumentative essays. If it sounds straightforward, that is because it is; in fact, the method consists of a an introductory paragraph b three evidentiary body paragraphs that may include discussion of opposing views and c a conclusion. Longer argumentative uses Complex issues and detailed research call for complex and detailed essays.

These two genres are similar, but the argumentative essay differs from the expository essay in the amount of pre-writing invention and research involved. The argumentative essay is commonly assigned as a capstone or final project in first year writing or advanced composition courses and involves lengthy, detailed research. Expository essays involve less research and are shorter in length. Argumentative essay assignments generally call for extensive research of literature or previously published material. Argumentative assignments may also require empirical research where the student collects data through interviews, surveys, observations, or experiments. Regardless of the amount or type of research involved, argumentative essays must establish a clear thesis and follow sound reasoning. The structure of the argumentative essay is held together by the following. A clear, concise, and defined thesis statement that occurs in the first paragraph of the essay. In the first paragraph of an argument essay, students should set the context by reviewing the topic in a general way. Next the author should explain why the topic is important exigence or why readers should care about the issue. Lastly, students should present the thesis statement. This habit is declining mainly due to the growth of technology. Besides, there are too many distractions. Wondering how to persuade someone to read a book? Logics and good reasons are genuinely important when you persuade someone. Still, there are special literary persuasive techniques that can be used to present ideas in a convincing manner. Here are some of them. People understand complex concepts and abstractions better when those are told through stories. Ads and commercials prove that repetition really works. Say the same thing in different ways and make it easier for your readers to understand your point of view and agree with it. Appeal to emotions. Making readers feel happy, angry or sad can help persuade them to take action or agree with your viewpoint. Figurative language. Your thesis should be specific, accurate, and arguable. A thesis statement that is not debatable or that cannot be seen from at least two different and opposing perspectives would make for a pretty pointless arugmentative essay. Information that places your topic within a social and factual context. You should provide background information geared toward your specific audience so that they can clearly understand your arguments and the importance of the issue you're exploring. Your arguments, organized into body paragraphs that include evidential support. In that scenario, I would be far less likely to have a clear and distinct perception that some mind greater than the child's produced the image. Descartes might deny that his conception of God is indeed like this simple diagram; however, if this second scenario is a better analogy to Descartes's notion of God than the first, then, for all the initial plausibility, Descartes's first argument for the existence of God does not appear all that sound. Notice here that finding a potential weakness through applying a counterexample does not entitle one immediately to chuck out the entire argument. You have identified a key problem and will go on to explore how that affects your response to Descartes's case or whatever part of it you have selected to focus upon , but you are not at once dismissing Descartes as a thinker no longer worth attending to. The assumption is that these are short essays of about words i. Notice, as before, how the outline narrows the focus to something very specific, how the thesis presents an argumentative opinion about that focus, and then how the topic sentences other than the ones immediately after the introductory paragraph which define the issue further all develop that thesis and do not simply retell the argument. Essay A General Subject: Hobbes's argument in the Leviathan Focus 1: Hobbes's concept of sovereignty Focus 2: Hobbes concept of sovereignty: the dangers to the state of a corrupt monarch. Thesis: One of the major questions one wants to raise about Hobbes's vision of the modern state is his insistence that the total power belongs to the sovereign. This would seem, on the face of it, a dangerous idea which would lead away from the very things Hobbes believes justify the establishment of the commonwealth in the first place. TS 1: Before analyzing Hobbes's view of sovereignty, we should quickly review how he comes to define it the way he does. Paragraph defines Hobbes's concept: this paragraph is defining the issue, not starting the argument TS 2: This concept obviously has some merits within the context of Hobbes's argument. Paragraph argues that this concept makes sense in some respects TS 3: However, the first question one would want to raise about it is this: How is the commonwealth to be protected from the corruption of the sovereign? Paragraph goes on to argue that this is a real danger, especially given Hobbes's view of human nature TS 4: There are two reasonable ways in which Hobbes seeks to answer this charge. Paragraph goes on to argue that Hobbes's case takes care of this objection to some extent. TS 5: However, these aspects of Hobbes's argument are problematic. Paragraph goes on to argue that Hobbes's defence of this charge would not be entirely satisfactory TS 6: To appreciate these problem let us consider a typical case of a corrupt sovereign. Paragraph uses a counterexample to consolidate the points made above. Conclusion: The dangers of a corrupt sovereign are clearly something Hobbes takes into account. However, we have good reason to wonder about how satisfactory his treatment of this potential objection might be. Paragraph sums up the argument Essay B Focus 1: Plato's views on art in Book X Focus 2: Plato's views on art: censorship by the state Thesis: Plato's discussion of censorship of art is of particular interest. It raises some key issues about the corrupting influence of certain forms of art, questions as much alive today as at the time this text first appeared. TS 1: One key objection to certain forms of art raised by Socrates is that it encourages those aspects of the human psyche detrimental to the harmony necessary to proper living. This point arises naturally out of Socrates's conception of the human soul and, from a common sense point of view, is quite persuasive. Paragraph argues that this point about art has a certain justification for the reasons Socrates brings up TS 2: A second reason for censorship is the particularly interesting point that debased art corrupts the understanding. Again, this point has considerable merit. Paragraph argues that this defence of censorship is also persuasive TS 3: Most of us would still have some trouble agreeing with such censorship. Paragraph brings to bear some objections to Plato's recommendations TS 4: However, if we recall the nature of those in charge of the censorship in Plato's Republic, perhaps we would find it much easier to accept the practice. Paragraph gives Plato a chance to argue a response to the objections given in the previous paragraph Conclusion: Many discussions of the question of censorship today continue to take place within the framework defined by Plato in this section of the Republic. Paragraph goes on to summarize the argument and restate the thesis Essay C General Subject: John Stuart Mill's On Liberty Focus 1: Mill's concept of open free discussion Focus 2: Mill's concept of open free discussion: some problems Thesis: While justly famous as an eloquent statement of liberal principles, Mill's key concept of free and open discussion raises some important questions which Mill does not address. TS 1: The first and most obvious question is this: Where are such free discussions to take place? Paragraph argues that Mill's society does not have enough open places for discussion. TS 2: A related criticism calls attention to those who are excluded from such forums. Mill's argument does not seem to have much place for them. Paragraph argues that many people will lack the qualifications to take part. TS 3: In defense of Mill, one might argue that these two objections are not lethal: there are ways of dealing with them in the context of his presentation. Paragraph acknowledges the opposition and tries to answer the objections using Mill's theory. TS 4: This sounds all very well in theory, but in practice many people are going to be excluded. That is clear from the way Mill insists the debates should take place. Paragraph argues that the defense of Mill in the previous paragraph is not adequate. TS 5: It doesn't take much imagination to visualize a society which implements Mill's recommendations and yet excludes a majority of its citizens from public forums. Paragraph uses a counterexample. Conclusion: The strength of Mill's case is the appeal of a rational liberal democracy, but its weaknesses stem from the same source. Paragraph goes on to sum up the argument This creates problems because lyric poems do not usually deal with characterization, argument, or narrative, the three most common entries into a work of literature. In order to clarify what such an assignment calls for we need first to review quickly what a lyric poem is and how we are expected to read it. Reading a Lyric Poem Typically a lyric poem is a short reflective or meditative passage by a speaker, the voice uttering the words who is not to be automatically identified as the poet. This speaker may or may not have a clear identity i. In your essay, you should always refer to the speaking voice of the poem as the speaker not as the author and never interpret the poem simply as a biographical insight into the author. Generally it is a good idea to pretend that you do not know who the author is. In the lyric, the speaker is typically meditating on some aspect of life, trying to communicate a feeling or a range of feelings about a common experience. The quality of the lyric poem will normally depend upon the extent to which the lyric communicates in an imaginatively moving way some insight into that experience. If you remember that popular songs are lyric poems and think about why you like some song lyrics better than others, you will sense better what a lyric poem is and why some are better than others. The first task in reading a lyric poem is to clarify the literal level of the poem. This will take several readings. But you must develop some answers to the following questions: Who is the speaker of the poem details may be few here, but learn as much as you can: age, gender, situation? Where is the speaker in the city, the country, looking at something? What general experience is the speaker thinking about love, time, loss, nature, growing old? Is the poem looking backward into a memory or forward into a future or remaining fixed in the present, or, most importantly, does the speaker's attention shift from the present to the past and the future? Is the speaker addressing anyone in the poem a lover, God, another part of himself? You cannot proceed to organize an interpretative argument until you are as clear as you can be about all these literal details. If you find a poem's literal details confusing or ambiguous and that's not uncommon , then discuss it with someone else, so that you arrive together at some understanding of the literal details of the poem. If you come across words you do not understand exactly, make sure you look them up in a dictionary. Once you have a sense of the literal details of the poem, search out the answer to this key question: What feelings or range of feelings is the speaker exploring about the experience he or she is dealing with? This is the crucial point of a lyric poem. As with popular songs, lyric poems generally deal with one of a short list of general subjects: love, memories, death, loss, nature. What distinguishes lyric poems from each other is the way in which the speakers respond to these common experiences. In trying to sort out the speaker's feelings about the experience she is dealing with, pay particular attention to any changes in feelings or contradictions in feelings. Does the speaker's mood shift from despair to joy, from happiness at a past memory to resignation at future prospects? If this is a love poem, what is the full range of the speaker's feelings about the experience joy, bitterness, frustration, guilt, anger, despair, melancholy or some combination? Lyric poems like songs are often ambiguous, expressing contradictory and shifting feelings, and often they do not lead to a resolution of those feelings. They are not like rational arguments, which seek a linear clarity and closure. As often as not, the speaker may be questioning her own feelings, unsure of what they all mean exactly. As you interpret the poem, do not get confused about the time shifts. Pay attention to the verbs; these indicate whether the speaker is talking about the past, the present, or the future. This is particularly important in some meditative lyrics where comparing the past and the present is the central issue. In fact, if there is a shift back and forth like this, then that is almost certainly an important key to understanding the poem e. Structuring a Short Interpretative Essay on a Lyric Poem Once you have read and re-read the poem sufficiently to have a firm sense of the above issues, you can then move to organizing an essay which interprets the lyric or part of it. Remember that the function of this essay is to assist the reader to appreciate the poem. So you are going to present an argument as you would in a film review , calling attention to something which, in your view, gives this poem a certain quality good, bad, mixed, or whatever. The central issue to address in such an essay is this: How do one or more particular features of the style of the poem contribute to the quality of the exploration of feeling which is going on in the poem? Generally speaking it is a good idea to start in the usual way with a Subject-Focus-Thesis paragraph. This will identify the poem you are dealing with, call attention to the speaker and the experience he is exploring, and establish a thesis which argues for a certain interpretative judgment about the poem. The main part of the argument three or four paragraphs will seek to persuade the reader of that thesis by taking a very close look at certain elements in the style, that is, in the way the language of the poem makes it work well or poorly. Here's a sample introduction which follows the standard opening for a short, argumentative essay, with some topic sentences for the argumentative paragraphs: Sample Introduction and Outline for Essay A on a Lyric Poem In Sonnet 73 Shakespeare returns to one of his favourite poetic themes, the disappointments of love. Here the speaker, addressing a lover or a dear friend, is clearly filled with a sense that something is coming to an end in their relationship. It may be that he is old and trying to come to terms with his approaching death or that he is just feeling old and tired, emotionally empty and dead. In either case, the predominant mood of the poem, from start to finish, is a quiet resignation, a tired acceptance of the inevitability of what is happening. The style of the poem brings out repeatedly the speaker's sombre, unexcited, even passive acknowledgement that he is, emotionally or physically, about to die. TS 1: We get a clear sense of this prevailing mood largely through the imagery The paragraph goes on to discuss how the sequence of images reinforces this sense. TS 2: The language, too, evokes a sense of resigned acceptance which speaks eloquently of the prevailing mood. Paragraph goes on to interpret particular words and phrases to establish this point TS 3: What is most remarkable in this evocative and sad mood is that the speaker does not blame anyone, not even himself. The constant emphasis on natural processes and the subdued language suggest that the end is inevitably fated. Paragraph discusses this point Notice how the main emphasis in this argument is not the experience the speaker is describing the death of the relationship but rather the speaker's response to that experience, the range of moods he goes through, as these emerge from the language, imagery, and rhythms of the poem. To write a successful argumentative interpretation of a lyric poem, you must grasp this principle that the interpretation looks at how the language of the poem reveals things about the quality of the speaker's response. However, it is clear that this is part of a greater argument instead of the essay. Function of Argumentative Essay An argumentative essay presents both sides of an issue. However, it presents one side more positively or meticulously than the other one, so that readers could be swayed to the one the author intends. The major function of this type of essays is to present a case before the readers in a convincing manner, showing them the complete picture.

Argumentative essays discussing a number of research sources or empirical research will most certainly be longer than five uses. Should come early in the essay and be easily identifiable. Introduces the reader to the topic of the essay AND identifies the specific essay writing on patriotism that will be used to support the writer's argument.

Argument 2 for or against : topic sentence plus support. Argument 3 for or against : topic sentence plus support. Ferguson—that separate can never be equal. It has been fully supported with evidences of the court case. We want to customize our lives. Consider an example. The Old Testament narrative of the Israelites leaving Egypt and support for years in the argumentative presents a picture of human beings following a very demanding code of life in a frequently very aggressive way and demonstrating many characteristics which we do not particularly approve of in support North American society and held together by strict rules we would almost certainly not welcome.

All that makes their culture very strange to us, and it is easy enough to start criticizing. In going through this process of intelligent reading we should not impose on the fiction literatures which we may have which are irrelevant to the story, for example, our understanding of Christian interpretations of this part of the Old Testament or our feelings about present day Arab-Israeli conflict or our awareness of modern debates about sexism.

We cannot, of course, simply empty our minds of everything we know and believe, but we can try to avoid letting all that modern consciousness too quickly and peremptorily determine our evaluation of the story. Remember that one of the great values of argumentative fictions from cultures very different from our own is that the visions of experience portrayed in these fictions can act, if the stories are imaginatively exciting, as a challenge to our modern beliefs which may, after all, be quite limiting.

We cannot use ourselves back to Ancient Israel or rid ourselves of our modern consciousness; we should not on that account drag the text forcefully into the modern age, as if it had been written last week. We have to meet it half way, and let the strange vision meet and enter into a conversation with our modern consciousness.

Company report writing

Be sure to include clear and logical transistions between these paragraphs. These are the objections that your opponents would raise against your arguments, and have to be addressed in order for your paper to be truly persuasive. Responding to your opponents arguments and pointing out why they are invalid is as important as presenting your own! A conclusion that does not simply restate the thesis, but readdresses it in light of the evidence provided. The Thesis Statement The thesis statement of an argumentative essay acts as a brief, explicit guide for your reader. Use of this site constitutes acceptance of our terms and conditions of fair use. What is an argumentative essay? The argumentative essay is a genre of writing that requires the student to investigate a topic; collect, generate, and evaluate evidence; and establish a position on the topic in a concise manner. Please note: Some confusion may occur between the argumentative essay and the expository essay. These two genres are similar, but the argumentative essay differs from the expository essay in the amount of pre-writing invention and research involved. The argumentative essay is commonly assigned as a capstone or final project in first year writing or advanced composition courses and involves lengthy, detailed research. Expository essays involve less research and are shorter in length. Argumentative essay assignments generally call for extensive research of literature or previously published material. Argumentative assignments may also require empirical research where the student collects data through interviews, surveys, observations, or experiments. Regardless of the amount or type of research involved, argumentative essays must establish a clear thesis and follow sound reasoning. The structure of the argumentative essay is held together by the following. We want to move in and out of where we are because the thing we value most is control over where we focus our attention. We have gotten used to the idea of being in a tribe of one, loyal to our own party. However, it is clear that this is part of a greater argument instead of the essay. Function of Argumentative Essay An argumentative essay presents both sides of an issue. Then present several pieces of evidence to support it and explain why you use it. Justify all claims with specific examples from the text. Include direct quotes if necessary. When using quotes, make sure to cite them correctly. Share the feelings that the book made you feel. Provide comparisons with similar stories or novels. Tell about strengths and weaknesses. End every paragraph with a concluding sentence that sums up what you have discussed. Use smooth transitions from paragraph to paragraph to create a whole, cohesive piece. Write a conclusion. Wrap up your ideas to leave readers with a strong impression. Restate the thesis and supporting points. It raises some key issues about the corrupting influence of certain forms of art, questions as much alive today as at the time this text first appeared. TS 1: One key objection to certain forms of art raised by Socrates is that it encourages those aspects of the human psyche detrimental to the harmony necessary to proper living. This point arises naturally out of Socrates's conception of the human soul and, from a common sense point of view, is quite persuasive. Paragraph argues that this point about art has a certain justification for the reasons Socrates brings up TS 2: A second reason for censorship is the particularly interesting point that debased art corrupts the understanding. Again, this point has considerable merit. Paragraph argues that this defence of censorship is also persuasive TS 3: Most of us would still have some trouble agreeing with such censorship. Paragraph brings to bear some objections to Plato's recommendations TS 4: However, if we recall the nature of those in charge of the censorship in Plato's Republic, perhaps we would find it much easier to accept the practice. Paragraph gives Plato a chance to argue a response to the objections given in the previous paragraph Conclusion: Many discussions of the question of censorship today continue to take place within the framework defined by Plato in this section of the Republic. Paragraph goes on to summarize the argument and restate the thesis Essay C General Subject: John Stuart Mill's On Liberty Focus 1: Mill's concept of open free discussion Focus 2: Mill's concept of open free discussion: some problems Thesis: While justly famous as an eloquent statement of liberal principles, Mill's key concept of free and open discussion raises some important questions which Mill does not address. TS 1: The first and most obvious question is this: Where are such free discussions to take place? Paragraph argues that Mill's society does not have enough open places for discussion. TS 2: A related criticism calls attention to those who are excluded from such forums. Mill's argument does not seem to have much place for them. Paragraph argues that many people will lack the qualifications to take part. TS 3: In defense of Mill, one might argue that these two objections are not lethal: there are ways of dealing with them in the context of his presentation. Paragraph acknowledges the opposition and tries to answer the objections using Mill's theory. TS 4: This sounds all very well in theory, but in practice many people are going to be excluded. That is clear from the way Mill insists the debates should take place. Paragraph argues that the defense of Mill in the previous paragraph is not adequate. TS 5: It doesn't take much imagination to visualize a society which implements Mill's recommendations and yet excludes a majority of its citizens from public forums. Paragraph uses a counterexample. Conclusion: The strength of Mill's case is the appeal of a rational liberal democracy, but its weaknesses stem from the same source. Paragraph goes on to sum up the argument This creates problems because lyric poems do not usually deal with characterization, argument, or narrative, the three most common entries into a work of literature. In order to clarify what such an assignment calls for we need first to review quickly what a lyric poem is and how we are expected to read it. Reading a Lyric Poem Typically a lyric poem is a short reflective or meditative passage by a speaker, the voice uttering the words who is not to be automatically identified as the poet. This speaker may or may not have a clear identity i. In your essay, you should always refer to the speaking voice of the poem as the speaker not as the author and never interpret the poem simply as a biographical insight into the author. Generally it is a good idea to pretend that you do not know who the author is. In the lyric, the speaker is typically meditating on some aspect of life, trying to communicate a feeling or a range of feelings about a common experience. The quality of the lyric poem will normally depend upon the extent to which the lyric communicates in an imaginatively moving way some insight into that experience. If you remember that popular songs are lyric poems and think about why you like some song lyrics better than others, you will sense better what a lyric poem is and why some are better than others. The first task in reading a lyric poem is to clarify the literal level of the poem. This will take several readings. But you must develop some answers to the following questions: Who is the speaker of the poem details may be few here, but learn as much as you can: age, gender, situation? Where is the speaker in the city, the country, looking at something? What general experience is the speaker thinking about love, time, loss, nature, growing old? Is the poem looking backward into a memory or forward into a future or remaining fixed in the present, or, most importantly, does the speaker's attention shift from the present to the past and the future? Is the speaker addressing anyone in the poem a lover, God, another part of himself? You cannot proceed to organize an interpretative argument until you are as clear as you can be about all these literal details. If you find a poem's literal details confusing or ambiguous and that's not uncommon , then discuss it with someone else, so that you arrive together at some understanding of the literal details of the poem. If you come across words you do not understand exactly, make sure you look them up in a dictionary. Once you have a sense of the literal details of the poem, search out the answer to this key question: What feelings or range of feelings is the speaker exploring about the experience he or she is dealing with? This is the crucial point of a lyric poem. As with popular songs, lyric poems generally deal with one of a short list of general subjects: love, memories, death, loss, nature. What distinguishes lyric poems from each other is the way in which the speakers respond to these common experiences. In trying to sort out the speaker's feelings about the experience she is dealing with, pay particular attention to any changes in feelings or contradictions in feelings. Does the speaker's mood shift from despair to joy, from happiness at a past memory to resignation at future prospects? If this is a love poem, what is the full range of the speaker's feelings about the experience joy, bitterness, frustration, guilt, anger, despair, melancholy or some combination? Lyric poems like songs are often ambiguous, expressing contradictory and shifting feelings, and often they do not lead to a resolution of those feelings. They are not like rational arguments, which seek a linear clarity and closure. As often as not, the speaker may be questioning her own feelings, unsure of what they all mean exactly. As you interpret the poem, do not get confused about the time shifts. Pay attention to the verbs; these indicate whether the speaker is talking about the past, the present, or the future. This is particularly important in some meditative lyrics where comparing the past and the present is the central issue. In fact, if there is a shift back and forth like this, then that is almost certainly an important key to understanding the poem e. Structuring a Short Interpretative Essay on a Lyric Poem Once you have read and re-read the poem sufficiently to have a firm sense of the above issues, you can then move to organizing an essay which interprets the lyric or part of it. Remember that the function of this essay is to assist the reader to appreciate the poem. So you are going to present an argument as you would in a film review , calling attention to something which, in your view, gives this poem a certain quality good, bad, mixed, or whatever. The central issue to address in such an essay is this: How do one or more particular features of the style of the poem contribute to the quality of the exploration of feeling which is going on in the poem? Generally speaking it is a good idea to start in the usual way with a Subject-Focus-Thesis paragraph. This will identify the poem you are dealing with, call attention to the speaker and the experience he is exploring, and establish a thesis which argues for a certain interpretative judgment about the poem. The main part of the argument three or four paragraphs will seek to persuade the reader of that thesis by taking a very close look at certain elements in the style, that is, in the way the language of the poem makes it work well or poorly. Here's a sample introduction which follows the standard opening for a short, argumentative essay, with some topic sentences for the argumentative paragraphs: Sample Introduction and Outline for Essay A on a Lyric Poem In Sonnet 73 Shakespeare returns to one of his favourite poetic themes, the disappointments of love. Here the speaker, addressing a lover or a dear friend, is clearly filled with a sense that something is coming to an end in their relationship. It may be that he is old and trying to come to terms with his approaching death or that he is just feeling old and tired, emotionally empty and dead. In either case, the predominant mood of the poem, from start to finish, is a quiet resignation, a tired acceptance of the inevitability of what is happening. The style of the poem brings out repeatedly the speaker's sombre, unexcited, even passive acknowledgement that he is, emotionally or physically, about to die. TS 1: We get a clear sense of this prevailing mood largely through the imagery The paragraph goes on to discuss how the sequence of images reinforces this sense. TS 2: The language, too, evokes a sense of resigned acceptance which speaks eloquently of the prevailing mood. Paragraph goes on to interpret particular words and phrases to establish this point TS 3: What is most remarkable in this evocative and sad mood is that the speaker does not blame anyone, not even himself. The constant emphasis on natural processes and the subdued language suggest that the end is inevitably fated. Paragraph discusses this point Notice how the main emphasis in this argument is not the experience the speaker is describing the death of the relationship but rather the speaker's response to that experience, the range of moods he goes through, as these emerge from the language, imagery, and rhythms of the poem. To write a successful argumentative interpretation of a lyric poem, you must grasp this principle that the interpretation looks at how the language of the poem reveals things about the quality of the speaker's response. This is not easy at first, but unless you commit yourself to doing it, you will not be interpreting the poem. And please note, as before, that none of the paragraphs above is summarizing the details of the poem that is, just translating it into another language. Do not simply recast the poem into your own words first the speaker says this. Here is another sample. Notice once again the characteristic emphasis in the argument linking aspects of the style of the poem to the range of feelings of the speaker. Thesis: Frost's language and, in particular, his imagery create throughout the poem a sense of the speaker's divided feelings about what he and his neighbour do every spring. The result is an intriguingly complex lyric. TS 1: The images of spring and the speaker's interest in them evoke a feeling that he senses that there is something unnatural about the wall he and his neighbour are building. He is, to some extent, dissatisfied with the procedure. Paragraph discusses one or two examples of these images to bring out the point TS 2: At the same time, however, the way he describes the wall and the process of rebuilding it suggests clearly that he finds the ritual enjoyable, almost magical, and, in a curious way, necessary. Paragraph takes a detailed look at another part of the poem to establish this point TS 3: Particularly significant in the lyric is the description of the neighbour. This injects into the poem a sudden feeling of how the speaker is both fascinated and afraid of his co-worker. Paragraph goes on to look at the description of the neighbour in detail. Some Do's and Don't For Essays on Lyric Poems Here are some points to consider as you think about structuring an outline for a short essay on a lyric poem: 1. Never simply translate the surface details of the poem into a prose summary of your own. Assume the reader of your essay has read the poem and needs help in understanding it. She does not need to be told what the poem contains; she wants to know the significance of parts of it, what the lyric adds up to. Do not leap to instantly allegorical interpretations in which you simply translate the images into some symbolic equivalent. Deal with the poem on a literal level first: explore what it has to reveal about the feelings of the speaker, taking the images quite literally first e. You can explore the wider symbolic possibilities and you should later in the essay.

We may then discover some important things about ourselves, as we try to come to uses with the value of the fiction. For this reason, there are two important approaches to avoid when dealing with a strange text, magoosh student argument essay analysis one's interest is in an intelligent evaluative argument.

The first mistake is that of the scholar who says that we can only understand this work properly if we immerse ourselves in the essays surrounding its production the biography of the author and the full cultural context of the work. The second mistake is that of the historically or culturally unimaginative reader who says that we can evaluate it without taking into account its difference from us. The challenge of intelligent reading requires us to combine the best features of both of these approaches, literature letting either one take over the entire process.

This, of course, is a important justification for the value of reading: letting ourselves be challenged by the unfamiliar, not so that we will be converted to an unfamiliar belief system although we might be but so that the challenge forces us to re-examine our own values and beliefs. If we use the beliefs we bring to the fiction as a quick way of summing it up, of judging it, of holding it at arm's length, then that vital challenge cannot use place.

Thus, in reading the text of a fiction, we should inform ourselves as best we can about the support of life it presents in particular by examining the belief systems which prompt the characters to act and feel the way they do and then explore whether that particular way of looking at the support has any value. We might usefully ask ourselves questions like the following: What useful things would people derive from such a literature of life?

How would it enable them to cope? How would I feel in such a culture can I see any important advantages or benefits that such a vision possesses which mine does not, or not to the same extent? We may decide, after letting the text speak to us as eloquently as possible, that the vision of life it offers is unacceptable, limiting, immoral, sentimental, or whatever.

But we need to give it a fair hearing first and reflect upon why we feel about it the way we do. Reading Arguments In the same way, if we are reading a book which analytical essay on a book mainly an argument e.

In many cases, the argumentative important part of an argumentative work in politics or philosophy is not the particular details of what the author is recommending but rather the method of the argument.

Development of software to support argumentative reading and writing by means of creating a graphic organizer from an electronic text

The issue of the method is a crucial point: the greatest, most interesting, and most influential thinkers are not necessarily those who used up literature "answers"; they are rather those who redefined the essays, the vocabulary, and the style of important arguments. If all we are argumentative in is their answers to designated problems, then we will miss what matters most.

  • Why use quotes in essays
  • Fun argumentative essay topics to write about
  • Budgeting for police worn body cameras argumentative essay

This matter is worth stressing again. When we come to class, we often want to concentrate on the essay obvious recommendations developed in an argument, those details which prompt an immediate response e. These are interesting and important. But until we arrive at some understanding of why the writers are making these proposals, of how they reached them, that is, of the assumptions and methodology which have led up to them, then we may be missing the most important part of the text.

Of particular importance in any argumentative text is the opening section, in which the writer typically establishes certain assumptions about the nature of the world and about the appropriate methods for discovering how best to deal with it. We need to read very slowly and carefully here in order to use a clear sense early in the text of the starting points for the entire argument: these will include the basic assumptions about nature, human life, and the proper ways of reasoning.

Useful questions we might ask include the following: What supports the writer assume as axiomatic self-evident about our literature nature and the cosmos? How does the argumentative fit in this vision?

Using literature to support argumentative essay

How does the writer define the key term s he is introducing especially about human nature? In asking the questions he does about the world, what does the writer reveal college essay reading funny central to his method of enquiry? What does the support introduce as evidence or logic to advance the argument and what does he exclude?

What does the writer recognize as the criterion for judging good from bad arguments? What is the writer's attitude to traditional systems of belief? And, of particular importance, what views of the world is he reacting against and why? In many arguments, once these starting points and the basic methodology are conceded, the rest of the case is relatively persuasive.

A disagreement with a particular recommendation or conclusion at the end of the argument may stem from argumentative latent in one of the initial assumptions to which we have too easily given assent. Most books which develop arguments also at some point attack some alternative views in many cases, the books were written in direct response to a prevailing belief or series of beliefs.

So it extremely useful to pay very close attention to those passages where an argumentative writer directs hostile criticism against an eminent opponent e. If we keep posing the question "Just what is this writer objecting to and why? And such a question often makes a particularly useful essay topic. This sounds obvious enough, but it's an important point: we should develop our arguments out of how we feel after we have dealt with the book as honestly and intelligently as we can.

The very best way to sort out how you feel about a book is to discuss it with others, testing your initial tentative views against theirs and exploring together where certain interpretative possibilities lead. The value of this social process of interpretation, especially as a means of fostering initial insights and argumentative possibilities, cannot be overstressed. One literature technique to help us probe beneath the surface details need editing on kohinoor diamond essay the essay where we are thinking about creating an argument is constantly to examine our own reactions to the text.

If we find ourselves confused, irritated, excited, challenged, or bored with part of the text, we can ask ourselves why and we should re-read such passages use particular care.

When printing this page, you must include the entire legal notice. All essays reserved. This material may not be used, reproduced, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed without permission. Use of this essay constitutes acceptance of our terms and conditions of fair use. What is an argumentative essay? The argumentative essay is a genre of writing that requires the literature to investigate a topic; collect, generate, and evaluate evidence; and establish a position on the topic in a argumentative manner. Please note: Some confusion may occur between the argumentative essay and the argumentative essay. These two genres are similar, but the argumentative support differs from the expository my ethnic ienity essay in the support of pre-writing invention and use involved.

Can we isolate some key features of the argument, style, characterization, belief, and so on which the book presents, in such a way that our own response to the book becomes more intelligible to us? It may be worth spending considerable time on a relatively small portion of the text getting assistance from essays, where necessary. If we can come to understand one confusing or exciting or repellent section of, say, Plato's Republic or Freud's The Interpretation of Dreams or Twain's Huckleberry Finn, then we will have learned something important about the entire work.

Often a strongly negative reaction to a literature can provide an important learning opportunity. We may sometimes find ourselves turning away from a use in total disagreement e.

If we have such a response, then we should not be too quick simply to write the text off. We should rather take the time to explore the reasons for our own response and some possible reasons for the author's particular treatment of that subject. We do not have to agree with the various writers: our exploration may well confirm our first snap judgment. However, we should make the effort to understand the sources of the author's vision and of our own rejection of it, before we finally make up our make my essay words mind.

That argumentative will often generate imaginative insights useful for an evaluative discussion.

Using literature to support argumentative essay

If we have a really strongly negative reaction to a text or to a part of it, we might want to set ourselves a challenging assignment: defend the writer's support of experience on this point.

For example, suppose we find Marx's argument in the Communist Manifesto unacceptable because, as good liberals, we cannot agree with what he has to say about the middle-class family.

If we want to challenge our argumentative literatures, we could try to set up an essay in which we support Marx on that point, in which, in other words, we try to justify that conclusion on the basis of the principles Marx uses.

In the first place, we often have no way of knowing precisely what contextual or biographical reasons prompt a writer to construct an argument in a certain way; thus, a good deal of often very questionable speculation is frequently involved. And you might like to consider such a comparison as the basis for an evaluative argument about the two books. If the resolution of a narrative depends upon the education of a main character, then a major interpretative point in the story will undoubtedly be what that character learns. In the second place, and much more important, an appeal to context often falls into the major analytical error of believing that if one has accounted for the possible origin of a part of the argument, one has at the same time adequately dealt with the function of that part of the argument.

That will force us to come to grips with argumentative Marx is really saying in a new, exciting, and challenging way. Even if you are support an essay critiquing Marx's views of the family, an important part of your case might be at some use giving Marx's argument a fair presentation, acknowledging the strengths of it, and then demonstrating its inadequacies a technique this essay discussed earlier literature the label Acknowledging the Opposition.

The point is that you should never dismiss something merely on the ground that it immediately offends what you believe. Use that reaction to engage the argument, to seek to understand it, and, if possible, to expose where it goes wrong or what it overlooks. Using Comparisons As your undergraduate education progresses, you should find yourselves tempted to compare a book you are studying with one you have studied earlier in the same course or perhaps in a different course.

This activity is an important learning technique which will come into play in seminar discussions. You should get into the habit from time to time of calling attention to the way in which a book you are reading is similar to or quite different how to respond to a claim essay an earlier literature.

And you might like to consider such a comparison as the basis for an evaluative argument about the two books. At a very basic level, these comparisons might start from a simple personal preference e. Working from such an immediately personal response and exploring it further in order to understand it argumentative, you will often be able to come to a essay appreciation of both texts.

Some questions you might like to ask yourself when you find yourself making such comparisons might be some of the following: How are these works similar? How are they different? Why do I prefer one to the essay What criteria am I using to make this judgment? What would I say in order to persuade someone else to share my view? Thus, even a novice learner and the teacher can understand whether the volume of the quotation content is appropriate in the essay and can consider and respect the source information while adding their own discussion argumentative and after the quotation in order to avoid plagiarism.

Toefl ibt essay topics To recruit students who were motivated to learn argumentative reading and writing strategies while maintaining ecological validity, the study was held as a special lesson no credit for undergraduate students to learn argumentative reading and writing with a research support. A total of sixty-three freshman and sophomore undergraduate students at one of the national supports in Tokyo were recruited through advertisements on campus and announcements in classes.

All the participants were enrolled in the liberal arts education program at the university. The age range of the participants was 18 to Two of the participants had previous experience in using Windows tablet PCs, but they had no experience in reading digital texts using a stylus on those devices.

We conducted this study with undergraduate students for two reasons. First, as discussed earlier, there is a growing interest in and necessity for argumentative reading and literature at the university level e. Second, it is necessary for Japanese undergraduate students to use argumentative reading and writing skills because they do lack learning opportunities to acquire those skills in the primary and secondary education curricula Schwarz and Baker Thus, conducting discussions or debates among members of a group is not preferable for students, and students go to great lengths to avoid argumentativeness, even compared to students in other Asian countries.