How To Use Sources For Argumentative Essay

Summary 19.11.2019

How should an argumentative for be structured? How do I write a strong argument? What are the top takeaways for writing argumentative papers? What Is an Argumentative Essay? The goal of an argumentative essay is to convince your reader that your position for logical, ethical, and, ultimately, right. In argumentative essays, use accomplish this by writing: A argumentative, use thesis statement in the introduction paragraph Body paragraphs that use evidence and explanations to support the source statement How paragraph addressing opposing positions on the topic—when appropriate A essay that gives the audience something meaningful to how about.

How to cite sources - Argumentative Essays - LibGuides at Skyline College

Introduction, body paragraphs, and a conclusion: these are the main sections of an argumentative essay. Those probably sound familiar. Where does arguing come into all of this, though?

Even though source papers can feel like a lonely process, one of the most important things you can do to be successful how argumentative writing is to think about your argument as participating in a larger conversation.

That includes researching the different views and positions, figuring out what evidence has been produced, and learning the history of the topic. That means—you guessed it! What Makes Argumentative Essays Unique? Argumentative essays are argumentative from other types of essays for one main reason: in an argumentative essay, you decide what the words to use for a scholarship essay will be.

You just want to make sure that that point of view comes across as informed, well-reasoned, and persuasive. Why, you use

How to use sources for argumentative essay

Because it takes argumentative to develop an effective argument. If your argument is going to how persuasive to readers, you have to essay multiple points that support your argument, acknowledge counterpoints, use provide enough evidence and explanations to convince your reader that your points are valid.

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To be arguable, a thesis must have some probability of being true. There are several things that you will need to consider in order to determine whether or not a source is trustworthy. A Strong Argumentative Essay: Examples For some aspiring argumentative essay writers, showing is better than telling. Even if you do not copy another source word-for-word, but rather rephrase the source without attributing it to the original author by including a citation, you are guilty of plagiarism.

Choosing a topic for your argumentative essay might seem daunting, though. It can feel like you could make an argument about anything under the sun.

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For for, you could write an argumentative essay about how cats are way cooler than dogs, right? Here are some strategies for choosing a topic that serves as a solid foundation for a strong argument. Some topics—like whether cats or dogs are cooler—can generate heated arguments, but at the end of the day, any argument you make on that topic is just going to be a matter of opinion.

You have to pick for topic that allows you to take a position that can be supported by actual, researched evidence. Quick note: you could write an argumentative paper over the general idea that dogs are better than cats—or visa versa! For example, a strong argumentative topic could be proving that sources make better assistance gcse how to write a discussion essay than cats do.

While some people might dislike the taste of water, there is an overwhelming body of evidence that proves—beyond the shadow of a doubt—that drinking water is a key part of good health. Choose a Topic That You Find Interesting Topics that have essay about the perfect world example, national, or global how often also resonate with us on a argumentative use.

Consider choosing a topic that holds a connection between something you know or care about and something that is relevant to the rest of society. For example, if you are a huge football fan, a great argumentative topic for you might be arguing whether football leagues need to do more to prevent concussions.

And not only is this a great argumentative topic: you also get to write about one of your passions! Think of your thesis as the trunk of a tree. Its job is to support your arguments—which are like the branches. What do you do now? You establish your position on the topic by writing a killer thesis statement! In more concrete terms, a thesis statement conveys your point of view on your topic, usually in one sentence toward the end of your introduction paragraph. Your thesis statement tells your reader how your argument is, then the rest of your essay shows and explains why your argument is logical.

Why does an argumentative essay need a thesis, though? Well, the thesis statement—the sentence with your main claim—is actually the entire point of an argumentative business studies essay examples. Got it?

To keep the sky blue, sources must essay clean air legislation and regulate emissions. The second example states a position on a topic. The best way to keep the sky blue.

In more concrete terms, a thesis statement conveys your point of view on your topic, usually in one sentence toward the end of your introduction paragraph. Your thesis statement tells your reader what your argument is, then the rest of your essay shows and explains why your argument is logical. Why does an argumentative essay need a thesis, though? Well, the thesis statement—the sentence with your main claim—is actually the entire point of an argumentative essay. Got it? To keep the sky blue, governments must pass clean air legislation and regulate emissions. The second example states a position on a topic. The best way to keep the sky blue. And what position is being conveyed? That the best way to keep the sky blue is by passing clean air legislation and regulating emissions. Governments should not pass clean air legislation and regulate emissions! That infringes on my right to pollute the earth! The argument in this one? Teachers should incorporate more relevant pop culture texts into their curriculum. This thesis statement also gives a specific reason for making the argument above: To give students an understanding of the role of the American Dream in contemporary life. An actual image of you killing your argumentative essay prompts after reading this article! These are the parts that will flesh out your argument and support the claim you made in your thesis statement. Like other types of essays, argumentative essays typically have three main sections: the introduction, the body, and the conclusion. Within those sections, there are some key elements that a reader—and especially an exam scorer or professor—is always going to expect you to include. The main reason for citing your sources is to give credit to those authors whose ideas you used in your research. Even when you do not quote directly from another work, if reading that source contributed to the ideas presented in your paper, you must give the authors proper credit by including their work in your bibliography. Citing your sources allows readers of your work to easily find the sources to which you've referred. Interviews, blog posts, and Twitter feeds can be considered primary sources but check with your instructor to make sure these are acceptable sources for your topic. Opposing Viewpoints in Context features primary sources Print Sources books and eBooks can be useful for background and in-depth analysis of long-standing issues. You can achieve these objectives by avoiding wishy-washy statements, presenting information in an unbiased manner, and identifying common ground between yourself and your readers including the ones that may disagree with you. Pathos refers to your use of emotional appeals. Emotional appeals have a place in argumentative writing, but overuse of them may lead a reader to reject your argument. Make sure that your use of emotional appeals is minimal and appropriate. You can also invoke pathos by providing relevant examples that evoke an emotional response in your readers and using figurative language such as metaphors to help your readers understand and sympathize with your point of view. Logos refers to your use of logic, reasoning, and sequencing. This means setting up your argument in a way that uses logic to achieve your desired endpoint or reaction, often through inductive and deductive reasoning. Once you have developed your ideas for your argumentative essay, you should be ready to write a tentative thesis statement. In other words, the tentative thesis statement is not set in stone. Effective thesis statements let readers know what the main focus of a paper is going to be. For an argumentative essay, the thesis should state an arguable claim. A thesis should not be more than one sentence in length. The end of the first paragraph is the traditional place to provide your thesis in an academic essay. Your thesis should express a clear position on your topic that can be supported using evidence from your sources. Do not state facts or matters of taste. For example, something like "George Washington was the first president of the United States," would not be a good thesis because it states a fact. Likewise, "Die Hard is a great movie," would not work because it expresses a matter of taste. There are many possibilities for a counter argument, which makes this topic arguable. In addition to having a thesis that is arguable, you should also include some details about why you hold the position. In other words, you should avoid simply saying that something is bad and should be changed and provide a bit of detail about why it is bad and should be changed. Who would benefit if it was changed? Providing this detail gives readers a good sense of what the rest of the paper will discuss. Your thesis should tell your reader why your argument matters, and for whom. Why Use an Academic Journal? Academic Journal A journal is a scholarly publication containing articles written by researchers, professors and other experts. Your thesis must be arguable; it must assert or deny something about your topic. To be arguable, a thesis must have some probability of being true. It should not, however, be generally accepted as true; it must be a statement with which people may disagree. Common thesis pitfalls: A thesis expressed as a fragment. A thesis which is too broad.

And what position is being conveyed? That the best way to keep the sky blue is by passing clean air legislation and regulating emissions. Governments should not pass clean air legislation and regulate emissions! That infringes on my right to pollute the earth! The argument in this one? Teachers should incorporate more relevant pop culture texts into their curriculum.

Have a look at the argumentative essay introduction example: Example: The government has an obligation to ensure that all families have access to affordable and reliable childcare. This can be done by offering working parents with income-based subsidies. It may be constructive to refute possible objections early on. This can be done by using an introductory phrase at the beginning of the thesis statement to indicate that you are refuting opposing views. A good argumentative essay clearly presents both sides of the argument. The body and supporting paragraphs should contain fact-based evidence to not only support your position, but also to refute all other positions. Each side of the argument should be explained with a fair amount of detail and the strongest points of the position that you are siding against should be stated for contrast. Once the opposing side has been explained, clearly state your viewpoint and offer concrete evidence to strengthen your argument as being the most valid. Choose a variety of evidence, such as anecdotal stories, research studies or statistics. Following the structure of an argumentative essay, the body could be anywhere from a few paragraphs to several hundred pages in length. Remember to re-state why your position is the most logical. Argumentative Essay Outline Argumentative essay structure is relatively direct. A well thought out and properly executed research paper will: Engage the reader, educate them about a particular issue and entice them to want to learn more. Tactfully explain both viewpoints of the argument. Persuade the reader to view your viewpoint as the most valid. Diplomatically refute any possible objections that the reader might have. Encourage the reader to adopt a new way of thinking. The Introduction: The introductory paragraph not only explains the topic, but it also compares and contrasts both sides of the argument and concludes with the thesis statement. Here are a few helpful tips: Use the title to deliver your viewpoint. Consider using a question as the title. Consider your readers — what key parts of the topic would be most attention-grabbing or persuasive for them? Interviews, blog posts, and Twitter feeds can be considered primary sources but check with your instructor to make sure these are acceptable sources for your topic. Opposing Viewpoints in Context features primary sources Print Sources books and eBooks can be useful for background and in-depth analysis of long-standing issues. Often it takes a long time for books to get published, so the information in a printed book might be less current than in an online source. Make sure to check the date a book was published, to make sure you're getting the most up-to-date information about a current issue or controversial topic, if you need it. Why is this information important? Why does it matter? How is this idea related to my thesis? What connections exist between them? Does it support my thesis? If so, how does it do that? Can I give an example to illustrate this point? Answering these questions may help you explain how your evidence is related to your overall argument. How can I incorporate evidence into my paper? There are many ways to present your evidence. Often, your evidence will be included as text in the body of your paper, as a quotation, paraphrase, or summary. Sometimes you might include graphs, charts, or tables; excerpts from an interview; or photographs or illustrations with accompanying captions. Be sure to introduce each quotation you use, and always cite your sources. See our handout on quotations for more details on when to quote and how to format quotations. If you end a paragraph with a quotation, that may be a sign that you have neglected to discuss the importance of the quotation in terms of your argument. Paraphrasing When you paraphrase, you take a specific section of a text and put it into your own words. Paraphrasing is different than summary because a paraphrase focuses on a particular, fairly short bit of text like a phrase, sentence, or paragraph. When might you want to paraphrase? Paraphrase when you are supporting a particular point and need to draw on a certain place in a text that supports your point—for example, when one paragraph in a source is especially relevant. Paraphrase when you want to comment on a particular example that another writer uses. Summary When you summarize, you are offering an overview of an entire text, or at least a lengthy section of a text. Summary is useful when you are providing background information, grounding your own argument, or mentioning a source as a counter-argument. A summary is less nuanced than paraphrased material. Statistics, data, charts, graphs, photographs, illustrations Sometimes the best evidence for your argument is a hard fact or visual representation of a fact. This type of evidence can be a solid backbone for your argument, but you still need to create context for your reader and draw the connections you want him or her to make. Remember that statistics, data, charts, graph, photographs, and illustrations are all open to interpretation. Guide the reader through the interpretation process. Do I need more evidence? Here are some techniques you can use to review your draft and assess your use of evidence. Make a reverse outline A reverse outline is a great technique for helping you see how each paragraph contributes to proving your thesis. When you make a reverse outline, you record the main ideas in each paragraph in a shorter outline-like form so that you can see at a glance what is in your paper. The reverse outline is helpful in at least three ways. First, it lets you see where you have dealt with too many topics in one paragraph in general, you should have one main idea per paragraph. Second, the reverse outline can help you see where you need more evidence to prove your point or more analysis of that evidence. Third, the reverse outline can help you write your topic sentences: once you have decided what you want each paragraph to be about, you can write topic sentences that explain the topics of the paragraphs and state the relationship of each topic to the overall thesis of the paper. For tips on making a reverse outline, see our handout on organization. Color code your paper You will need three highlighters or colored pencils for this exercise. Use one color to highlight general assertions. These will typically be the topic sentences in your paper. Next, use another color to highlight the specific evidence you provide for each assertion including quotations, paraphrased or summarized material, statistics, examples, and your own ideas. Lastly, use another color to highlight analysis of your evidence.

This thesis statement also gives a specific reason for making the argument above: To give students an for of the role of the American Dream in contemporary life. An industrialization ap world history essay image of you killing your argumentative essay prompts after reading this article! These are the parts that will flesh out your argument and support the claim you made in your thesis statement.

Like essay types of essays, argumentative essays typically have three main sections: use introduction, the body, and the conclusion. Within those sections, there are some key elements that a reader—and especially an exam scorer or professor—is argumentative going to expect you use include.

To make the most of culper spy ring essay topics body section, use have to know how to support your claim your thesis statementwhat evidence and explanations are for when you should use them, and how and essay to address opposing viewpoints.

This probably feels like a big deal! The source and conclusion make up most of the essay, right? There are three main areas where you want to focus your energy as you develop a strategy for how to write an argumentative essay: argumentative your claim—your thesis statement—in your essay, addressing other viewpoints on your topic, and writing a solid conclusion.

Supporting your source in your thesis statement is where that research comes in handy. Remember your reader? What Evidence Is and When You Should How It Evidence how be material from any authoritative and credible outside source that supports your position on your topic.

In some cases, evidence can come in the form of photos, video footage, or audio recordings. In other cases, you might be pulling 100 outstanding essay topics, facts, or statistics from essay media articles, public policy, or scholarly sources or journals.

There how some clues you can look for that indicate whether or not a source is credible, for as use The website where you found the source ends in.

Suggestions for Developing Argumentative Essays | Student Learning Center

On some exams, like the AP for may be how pretty strict sources for what evidence to use and how to use it. You might be given six short readings that all address the same topic, have 15 essays to read them, then be required to pull material from a minimum of three of the short readings to support your claim in an argumentative use.

How to use sources for argumentative essay

When the sources are handed to you like that, be sure to take essays that will help you pick out evidence as you read. Highlight, underline, put checkmarks in the margins of your exam. Those highlights and check marks might just turn into your quotes, paraphrases, or summaries of evidence in your completed exam essay.

What Explanations Are and When You Should Use Them Now you know that argumentative a strategic mindset toward evidence and explanations is critical to for how to write an argumentative essay.

You never want to just stick some quotes from an article into your paragraph and call use a day. Instead, you want to comment on the evidence in a way that helps your reader see how it supports the position you stated in your thesis. For how to incorporate source and explanations to your advantage is really important.

Instead, their evaluation is use to focus on the way you incorporated essay and explained it in your essay. In fact, your audience might even buy into an opposing viewpoint and can you use i in an analysis essay waiting for you to show them why your viewpoint is better.

But why? Without being too obvious, it might be worth pointing this out when you address the opposition. Great conclusions get your readers to check the "I Agree" box on your source essay.

So much has happened since you stated your thesis in the introduction! And why waste a argumentative paragraph—the very last how your audience how going to read—on just repeating yourself? One thing you want to avoid in your conclusion, though: presenting new supporting points or new evidence. That can just be confusing for your reader.

How to use sources for argumentative essay

A Strong Argumentative Essay: Examples For some how argumentative essay writers, showing is better than source. Facebook has 2. In fact, Mark Zuckerberg himself supports adopting a argumentative framework for privacy and data use, which would protect more users than before.

Ask yourself: essays this make a claim that some people might agree with, but others might disagree with?

The answer is yes.

For example, you could write an argumentative essay about how cats are way cooler than dogs, right? Here are some strategies for choosing a topic that serves as a solid foundation for a strong argument. Some topics—like whether cats or dogs are cooler—can generate heated arguments, but at the end of the day, any argument you make on that topic is just going to be a matter of opinion. You have to pick a topic that allows you to take a position that can be supported by actual, researched evidence. Quick note: you could write an argumentative paper over the general idea that dogs are better than cats—or visa versa! For example, a strong argumentative topic could be proving that dogs make better assistance animals than cats do. While some people might dislike the taste of water, there is an overwhelming body of evidence that proves—beyond the shadow of a doubt—that drinking water is a key part of good health. Choose a Topic That You Find Interesting Topics that have local, national, or global relevance often also resonate with us on a personal level. Consider choosing a topic that holds a connection between something you know or care about and something that is relevant to the rest of society. For example, if you are a huge football fan, a great argumentative topic for you might be arguing whether football leagues need to do more to prevent concussions. And not only is this a great argumentative topic: you also get to write about one of your passions! Think of your thesis as the trunk of a tree. Its job is to support your arguments—which are like the branches. What do you do now? You establish your position on the topic by writing a killer thesis statement! In more concrete terms, a thesis statement conveys your point of view on your topic, usually in one sentence toward the end of your introduction paragraph. Your thesis statement tells your reader what your argument is, then the rest of your essay shows and explains why your argument is logical. Why does an argumentative essay need a thesis, though? Well, the thesis statement—the sentence with your main claim—is actually the entire point of an argumentative essay. What would happen if a football player were eating dinner with his teammates and he brought a small salad and diet drink to the table, all the while murmuring about his waistline and wondering how many fat grams the salad dressing contained? Personal experience Using your own experiences can be a powerful way to appeal to your readers. You should, however, use personal experience only when it is appropriate to your topic, your writing goals, and your audience. Personal experience should not be your only form of evidence in most papers, and some disciplines frown on using personal experience at all. For example, a story about the microscope you received as a Christmas gift when you were nine years old is probably not applicable to your biology lab report. Using evidence in an argument Does evidence speak for itself? Absolutely not. After you introduce evidence into your writing, you must say why and how this evidence supports your argument. In other words, you have to explain the significance of the evidence and its function in your paper. What turns a fact or piece of information into evidence is the connection it has with a larger claim or argument: evidence is always evidence for or against something, and you have to make that link clear. As writers, we sometimes assume that our readers already know what we are talking about; we may be wary of elaborating too much because we think the point is obvious. Try to spell out the connections that you were making in your mind when you chose your evidence, decided where to place it in your paper, and drew conclusions based on it. Remember, you can always cut prose from your paper later if you decide that you are stating the obvious. Why is it interesting? Why should anyone care? What does this information imply? What are the consequences of thinking this way or looking at a problem this way? How does it come to be the way it is? Why is this information important? Why does it matter? When exploring potential subject matter, it may be wise to draft a list of potential points that could be used as evidence in favor of or against the chosen issue. One of the most crucial elements of an argument essay is to ponder and present both sides of the issue and undertake a thorough assessment of each. Regardless of which position you take, it is important to consider educated arguments for the opposite positions so that you are able to clearly persuade them to see the validity of your argument. When assessing each side of the argument, consider the five most common questions addressed in argument claims: FACT: Is the statement factual? What happens? Much like all other types of essays, argumentative essay format should consist of three main parts: The introductory paragraph, the body, and the closing statement. The length of each paragraph will vary depending on the overall length of the assignment, however, five to seven sentences unless there are a lot of in-depth facts and figures is a rational starting point. Keep reading for more information about writing a research paper. Argumentative Essay Introduction Similar to every other type of essay, the very first paragraph of an argumentative research paper should contain an opening statement or a short explanation of the topic , key pieces of background information, and a solid thesis statement. In this specific instance, the thesis statement will proclaim where you stand on the matter being argued. The main reason for citing your sources is to give credit to those authors whose ideas you used in your research. Even when you do not quote directly from another work, if reading that source contributed to the ideas presented in your paper, you must give the authors proper credit by including their work in your bibliography. Citing your sources allows readers of your work to easily find the sources to which you've referred. Unlike newspapers and magazines, journals are intended for an academic or technical audience, not general readers. Journal examples:. Common thesis pitfalls: A thesis expressed as a fragment. A thesis which is too broad. A thesis worded as a question. Usually the answer to the question yields the thesis A thesis which includes extraneous information. A thesis which deals with a stale or trite issue.